TENNESSEE

955 Woodland Street 
Nashville, TN 37206
Phone:  (615) 383-9442Fax:  (615) 383-1176Toll-Free:  (888) 643-7811
Primary Contact(s):
Julie Sullivan (931) 212-5557
Donna DeStefano (615) 383-9442
Belinda Hotchkiss (615) 383-9442
Grant Abstract Summary:
The TN Family-to-Family Health Information Center includes activities at the systems and community levels. Goals address priorities established by the TN Department of Health, Maternal Child Health and health care needs identified by families related to (1) transition in to adult life, (2) medical homes, and (3) access to health care. Family Staff members will provide culturally and linguistically effective outreach, leadership training, support and assistance to families, data collection and management, and coordination with families, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders to promote family and professional partnerships that advance family-centered care and the six National Performance measures & Healthy People 2010-12 objectives.

Activities/Methodology: Systems Level-Public-private partnership involving coordination/collaboration with various state agency personnel and families are critical to a systems-level approach to build capacity, identify models of health delivery, ensure family-professional partnerships, and provide families with meaningful roles. TDC has ongoing relationships with public and private entities throughout the state, including its 42-member agencies. Family Resource Specialists (FRS) will identify families to serve on committees/task forces and support families in their advisory and advocacy roles. FRS will have regular contact with families, asking them what support they need to participate in their advisory/technical roles.

Community Level-FRS will engage all stakeholders (families, professionals) as they conduct outreach, education and training, engaging public and private partner agencies to accomplish these activities. The major focus will be around identified priorities in order to improve transition to adult life, increase families’ knowledge of medical home components to better inform public policy, and improve access to health care. FRS will utilize the regional parent-to-parent approach that has proven to be effective in developing trusting, lasting relationships with families throughout the years. Staff will focus on providing quality, up-to-date information and resources to families of CSHCN and promoting good treatments decisions, cost effectiveness and improved health outcomes.
Highlighted Activity:
Family-Centered Care Workshops – Transition Booklet
Family Voices of Tennessee has trained 27 parents/family members in numerous Family Centered Care workshops across the state. These workshops teach families about what Family-Centered Care is and how to partner with their child’s health care provider. Trainings are available statewide upon request. Participants leave with clear follow up activities and have scheduled calls with FVTN staff. A transition booklet called “Dude, Where’s My Transition Plan”, was developed by FVTN in collaboration with KY F2F HIC in 2012. This booklet was updated by FVTN and STEP (TN’s PTI) in February 2014. Three new pages were added, including a page on allergies, internet safety and additional information regarding transportation. 500 copies have recently been printed and are being disseminated. The booklet is also available on the FVTN website.
Shared Resources:
Resources are shared by the F2FHICs to help families, other family leaders and partners. While you are welcome to adapt any of the materials for your organization, we ask that you include an acknowledgement of the author/source in your adaptations and that you let the original author know of your use of the materials. Copyrighted materials may not be reproduced or adapted without the express permission of the author.
A 1-pager describing the services, activities, trainings, and contact information for the TN F2F HIC,
Logic Model diagram of F2F project showing activities and outcomes.
What Others are Saying about this F2F HIC:

My experience with the LEND/MIND program has been so enlightening. I truly can see the MD and other professionals’ position more clearly, whereas before, I only saw them as the messenger. I now see them as people, who more often than not, are striving to provide the best treatment they believe will help my or someone else's child. It has also been very empowering to have a voice at the table of higher education professionals to speak to the experiences of being a parent of a CSHCN. The blending of professionals and families in this program is a perfect partnership to train upcoming medical and social services professionals.

- a parent